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C&EN's Chemistry in Pictures showcases the beauty of chemistry, chemical engineering, and related sciences. Submit photos using the tab above or use the hashtag #cenchempics on Facebook or Twitter to share your chemistry in pictures.

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STARRY EYED

Just in time for the Jewish High Holidays comes a Star of David catenane. The molecule, which was synthesized by chemists David A. Leigh, Robin G. Pritchard, and Alexander J. Stephens at the University of Manchester, in England, consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings. “The Star of David catenane is the most highly entwined mechanically interlocked molecule made to date,” Leigh says. “Linking and entwining molecular rings may lead to new generations of materials that are strong but light and flexible.”

Credit:  Nat. Chem. 2014, DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2056 

Related C&EN Stories:

Packing On Positive Charge

STARRY EYED

Just in time for the Jewish High Holidays comes a Star of David catenane. The molecule, which was synthesized by chemists David A. Leigh, Robin G. Pritchard, and Alexander J. Stephens at the University of Manchester, in England, consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings. “The Star of David catenane is the most highly entwined mechanically interlocked molecule made to date,” Leigh says. “Linking and entwining molecular rings may lead to new generations of materials that are strong but light and flexible.”

Credit:  Nat. Chem. 2014, DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2056 

Related C&EN Stories:

Packing On Positive Charge

NO DELICACY

These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”

Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

NO DELICACY


These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”
Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

NO DELICACY

These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”

Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

GOLD MINE

Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.

Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

GOLD MINE
Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.
Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

GOLD MINE

Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.

Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

Congratulations to Andres Tretiakov, a lab technician at St. Paul’s School in London, who photographed element blocks that he’s creating to assemble a tangible periodic table.
Tretiakov will receive a $50 cash prize. A Grand Prize winner will be selected at the end of the year. They will get their photograph published in C&EN and receive a Canon Digital SLR Camera.

Enter our monthly photo contest here for your chance to win!

SELECTIVE

Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.

Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)


SELECTIVE
Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.
Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)

SELECTIVE

Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.

Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)

GLASSWARE

C&EN readers Stuart and Martina Chambers, who recently celebrated their second wedding anniversary, used beakers and Erlenmeyer flasks as part of their 2012 chemistry-themed nuptials.

Credit: Courtesy of Martina Chambers

Related C&EN Stories:

Nerdy Nuptials

Pheromone Parties, Nerdy Nuptials, Wedding Day Preparedness

Newscripts Oct. 13, 2012

GLASSWARE
C&EN readers Stuart and Martina Chambers, who recently celebrated their second wedding anniversary, used beakers and Erlenmeyer flasks as part of their 2012 chemistry-themed nuptials.
Credit: Courtesy of Martina Chambers
Related C&EN Stories:
Nerdy Nuptials
Pheromone Parties, Nerdy Nuptials, Wedding Day Preparedness
Newscripts Oct. 13, 2012

HYDROGEN-POWERED BOTTLE ROCKET

To simulate the main launch engines of the Space Shuttle program for school groups, Lucio Gelmini of MacEwan University fills a pop bottle with a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen gas. He then loads it into a polyvinylchloride (PVC) tube and ignites it using a barbeque lighter. In the distance at top left, the soaring pop bottle is visible.

Submitted by Lucio Gelmini (Gelminil@macewan.ca) (Enter our photo contest here)

HYDROGEN-POWERED BOTTLE ROCKET
To simulate the main launch engines of the Space Shuttle program for school groups, Lucio Gelmini of MacEwan University fills a pop bottle with a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen gas. He then loads it into a polyvinylchloride (PVC) tube and ignites it using a barbeque lighter. In the distance at top left, the soaring pop bottle is visible.
Submitted by Lucio Gelmini (Gelminil@macewan.ca) (Enter our photo contest here)

HYDROGEN-POWERED BOTTLE ROCKET

To simulate the main launch engines of the Space Shuttle program for school groups, Lucio Gelmini of MacEwan University fills a pop bottle with a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen gas. He then loads it into a polyvinylchloride (PVC) tube and ignites it using a barbeque lighter. In the distance at top left, the soaring pop bottle is visible.

Submitted by Lucio Gelmini (Gelminil@macewan.ca) (Enter our photo contest here)

CRYSTALLIZED

Formed over three days in methylene chloride and diethyl ether, these brilliant orange crystalline needles are made of a “half-sandwich” rhodium metal complex. This air- and water-stable complex could potentially behave as a catalyst in the water oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids in aqueous solution. Developing catalysts that use water as an oxidant is highly desirable because of the benign and environmentally friendly nature of water compared to many other oxidants.

Credit: Submitted by Jeremy Tran (Enter our photo contest here.)

CRYSTALLIZED
Formed over three days in methylene chloride and diethyl ether, these brilliant orange crystalline needles are made of a “half-sandwich” rhodium metal complex. This air- and water-stable complex could potentially behave as a catalyst in the water oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids in aqueous solution. Developing catalysts that use water as an oxidant is highly desirable because of the benign and environmentally friendly nature of water compared to many other oxidants.
Credit: Submitted by Jeremy Tran (Enter our photo contest here.)

CRYSTALLIZED

Formed over three days in methylene chloride and diethyl ether, these brilliant orange crystalline needles are made of a “half-sandwich” rhodium metal complex. This air- and water-stable complex could potentially behave as a catalyst in the water oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids in aqueous solution. Developing catalysts that use water as an oxidant is highly desirable because of the benign and environmentally friendly nature of water compared to many other oxidants.

Credit: Submitted by Jeremy Tran (Enter our photo contest here.)

TWINNING

Studying the behavior of transition metal oxide nanomaterials, such as the one shown here, may one day lead to improved electronics and energy storage devices. Imaged by a transmission electron microscope, this HfO2 nanorod (about 33 nm long) contains multiple crystalline regions (shown in green and red) separated by twin boundaries.

Credit: Submitted by Sean Depner (Enter our photo contest here.); ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn501632d

TWINNING
Studying the behavior of transition metal oxide nanomaterials, such as the one shown here, may one day lead to improved electronics and energy storage devices. Imaged by a transmission electron microscope, this HfO2 nanorod (about 33 nm long) contains multiple crystalline regions (shown in green and red) separated by twin boundaries.
Credit: Submitted by Sean Depner (Enter our photo contest here.); ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn501632d

TWINNING

Studying the behavior of transition metal oxide nanomaterials, such as the one shown here, may one day lead to improved electronics and energy storage devices. Imaged by a transmission electron microscope, this HfO2 nanorod (about 33 nm long) contains multiple crystalline regions (shown in green and red) separated by twin boundaries.

Credit: Submitted by Sean Depner (Enter our photo contest here.); ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn501632d

COLD SNAP

When water condenses on a cold surface in the presence of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) or certain other small gas-phase molecules, a type of caged complex called a clathrate can form. In ambient conditions such as at a laboratory bench, water becomes ice, forming tiny cages around the small molecules. The phenomenon is common when a researcher filters CH2Cl2 solutions (shown here):  The evaporating solvent simultaneously cools the filter paper and saturates the immediate surroundings with gaseous CH2Cl2.

Credit: Sophia Lai

Related C&EN Stories:

Mid-Atlantic Methane Mystery

COLD SNAP
When water condenses on a cold surface in the presence of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) or certain other small gas-phase molecules, a type of caged complex called a clathrate can form. In ambient conditions such as at a laboratory bench, water becomes ice, forming tiny cages around the small molecules. The phenomenon is common when a researcher filters CH2Cl2 solutions (shown here):  The evaporating solvent simultaneously cools the filter paper and saturates the immediate surroundings with gaseous CH2Cl2.
Credit: Sophia Lai
Related C&EN Stories:
Mid-Atlantic Methane Mystery

COLD SNAP

When water condenses on a cold surface in the presence of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) or certain other small gas-phase molecules, a type of caged complex called a clathrate can form. In ambient conditions such as at a laboratory bench, water becomes ice, forming tiny cages around the small molecules. The phenomenon is common when a researcher filters CH2Cl2 solutions (shown here):  The evaporating solvent simultaneously cools the filter paper and saturates the immediate surroundings with gaseous CH2Cl2.

Credit: Sophia Lai

Related C&EN Stories:

Mid-Atlantic Methane Mystery

ALL THE WAY

A rare double rainbow takes shape above the 11th-century Church of Sant Miquel, in the province of Barcelona, Spain. When a person sees a rainbow, it’s because sunlight from behind them reflects and refracts in water droplets in the distance. Shorter wavelengths of light (blue hues) are scattered more easily by molecules and particles in the air than are long wavelengths (red hues), so at long distances and when there’s a heavy particle load in the air, reddish hues sometimes dominate, as seen here.

Credit: J.C. Casado/www.starryearth.com

ALL THE WAY
A rare double rainbow takes shape above the 11th-century Church of Sant Miquel, in the province of Barcelona, Spain. When a person sees a rainbow, it’s because sunlight from behind them reflects and refracts in water droplets in the distance. Shorter wavelengths of light (blue hues) are scattered more easily by molecules and particles in the air than are long wavelengths (red hues), so at long distances and when there’s a heavy particle load in the air, reddish hues sometimes dominate, as seen here.
Credit: J.C. Casado/www.starryearth.com

ALL THE WAY

A rare double rainbow takes shape above the 11th-century Church of Sant Miquel, in the province of Barcelona, Spain. When a person sees a rainbow, it’s because sunlight from behind them reflects and refracts in water droplets in the distance. Shorter wavelengths of light (blue hues) are scattered more easily by molecules and particles in the air than are long wavelengths (red hues), so at long distances and when there’s a heavy particle load in the air, reddish hues sometimes dominate, as seen here.

Credit: J.C. Casado/www.starryearth.com

SEPARATION

While carrying out a liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane and a sample of lake water, Jennifer Apell, a graduate student at MIT, observed the formation of an emulsion in the sample, likely due to the presence of certain chemicals in the water. When she let the dichloromethane and water separate, air bubbles became trapped by the emulsion layer at the dichloromethane/water interface, creating the effect seen in this picture. Apell is studying the bioavailable concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated water bodies to assess their risk to living organisms.  

Credit: Submitted by Jennifer Apell (Enter our photo contest here.)

SEPARATION
While carrying out a liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane and a sample of lake water, Jennifer Apell, a graduate student at MIT, observed the formation of an emulsion in the sample, likely due to the presence of certain chemicals in the water. When she let the dichloromethane and water separate, air bubbles became trapped by the emulsion layer at the dichloromethane/water interface, creating the effect seen in this picture. Apell is studying the bioavailable concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated water bodies to assess their risk to living organisms.   
Credit: Submitted by Jennifer Apell (Enter our photo contest here.)

SEPARATION

While carrying out a liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane and a sample of lake water, Jennifer Apell, a graduate student at MIT, observed the formation of an emulsion in the sample, likely due to the presence of certain chemicals in the water. When she let the dichloromethane and water separate, air bubbles became trapped by the emulsion layer at the dichloromethane/water interface, creating the effect seen in this picture. Apell is studying the bioavailable concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated water bodies to assess their risk to living organisms.  

Credit: Submitted by Jennifer Apell (Enter our photo contest here.)