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C&EN's Chemistry in Pictures showcases the beauty of chemistry, chemical engineering, and related sciences. Submit photos using the tab above or use the hashtag #cenchempics on Facebook or Twitter to share your chemistry in pictures.

Sept's Contest Winner

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CHALCONE AGAINST CANCER

Bright yellow crystals of spinochalcone A decorate the bottom of a flask. Cristina Castillo, an undergraduate pharmaceutical chemistry major at the Scientific Research Center of Yucatán in Mexico, isolated these crystals from Aeschynomene fascicularis, a plant used in Mayan traditional medicine. The experiment was part of her undergraduate thesis to determine how spinochalcone A affects cancer cells.

Credit: Cristina Castillo (Enter our photo contest here)

CHALCONE AGAINST CANCER
Bright yellow crystals of spinochalcone A decorate the bottom of a flask. Cristina Castillo, an undergraduate pharmaceutical chemistry major at the Scientific Research Center of Yucatán in Mexico, isolated these crystals from Aeschynomene fascicularis, a plant used in Mayan traditional medicine. The experiment was part of her undergraduate thesis to determine how spinochalcone A affects cancer cells.
Credit: Cristina Castillo (Enter our photo contest here)

CHALCONE AGAINST CANCER

Bright yellow crystals of spinochalcone A decorate the bottom of a flask. Cristina Castillo, an undergraduate pharmaceutical chemistry major at the Scientific Research Center of Yucatán in Mexico, isolated these crystals from Aeschynomene fascicularis, a plant used in Mayan traditional medicine. The experiment was part of her undergraduate thesis to determine how spinochalcone A affects cancer cells.

Credit: Cristina Castillo (Enter our photo contest here)

September Contest Winner
Congratulations to Kenneth Hanson, an assistant professor of chemistry at Florida State University, who photographed scattered light from two different laser beams, research that could lead to solar energy applications. 

Hanson will receive a $50 cash prize. A Grand Prize winner will be selected at the end of the year. They will get their photograph published in C&EN and receive a Canon Digital SLR Camera.

Enter our monthly photo contest here for your chance to win!

TEST FOR TAINTED MILK

In India, people sometimes adulterate milk with formaldehyde to increase the beverage’s shelf life. To develop a test to detect even minute amounts of the carcinogen in milk, Mahesh Agharkar and his colleagues at Pune University are investigating ways to increase the sensitivity of Tollen’s reagent, an aldehyde indicator, using gold nanoparticles. In the solutions shown, increasing concentrations of Tollen’s reagent (0 to 1,000 ppm, from right to left) interact with formaldehyde and gold nanoparticles to cause a color change.  The researchers hope this preliminary research might one day lead to a visual indicator for tainted milk.  

Credit: Mahesh Agharkar (Enter our photo contest here)

TEST FOR TAINTED MILK
In India, people sometimes adulterate milk with formaldehyde to increase the beverage’s shelf life. To develop a test to detect even minute amounts of the carcinogen in milk, Mahesh Agharkar and his colleagues at Pune University are investigating ways to increase the sensitivity of Tollen’s reagent, an aldehyde indicator, using gold nanoparticles. In the solutions shown, increasing concentrations of Tollen’s reagent (0 to 1,000 ppm, from right to left) interact with formaldehyde and gold nanoparticles to cause a color change.  The researchers hope this preliminary research might one day lead to a visual indicator for tainted milk.   
Credit: Mahesh Agharkar (Enter our photo contest here)

TEST FOR TAINTED MILK

In India, people sometimes adulterate milk with formaldehyde to increase the beverage’s shelf life. To develop a test to detect even minute amounts of the carcinogen in milk, Mahesh Agharkar and his colleagues at Pune University are investigating ways to increase the sensitivity of Tollen’s reagent, an aldehyde indicator, using gold nanoparticles. In the solutions shown, increasing concentrations of Tollen’s reagent (0 to 1,000 ppm, from right to left) interact with formaldehyde and gold nanoparticles to cause a color change.  The researchers hope this preliminary research might one day lead to a visual indicator for tainted milk.  

Credit: Mahesh Agharkar (Enter our photo contest here)

SCRUB

This TiO2 nanocage is the key component of a photocatalytic reactor that might one day be used to break down common organic pollutants in air and water. Researchers expose a titanium sheet studded with the nanocages, which are roughly 4 µm on each side, to contaminated air or water. Under ultraviolet light, the cages degrade pollutants such as formaldehyde and toluene almost 10 times as well as conventional TiO2 catalysts, the researchers say.

Submitted by Murtaza Sayed, University of Peshawar, Pakistan (Enter our photo contest here)

Related C&EN Stories:

Porosity Assists Selectivity

Proteins As Building Blocks

Graphene Surprises By Decomposing

SCRUB
This TiO2 nanocage is the key component of a photocatalytic reactor that might one day be used to break down common organic pollutants in air and water. Researchers expose a titanium sheet studded with the nanocages, which are roughly 4 µm on each side, to contaminated air or water. Under ultraviolet light, the cages degrade pollutants such as formaldehyde and toluene almost 10 times as well as conventional TiO2 catalysts, the researchers say.
Submitted by Murtaza Sayed, University of Peshawar, Pakistan (Enter our photo contest here)
Related C&EN Stories:
Porosity Assists Selectivity
Proteins As Building Blocks
Graphene Surprises By Decomposing

A LITTLE TLC

Under an ultraviolet lamp, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates glow with an eerie beauty. Used to monitor the progress of a reaction or as an initial purity test of a newly prepared chemical product, a pile of TLC plates like this is often the end result of a long day of chemical research.

Submitted By: John Anderson (jander43@utk.edu) (Enter our photo contest here)

A LITTLE TLC
Under an ultraviolet lamp, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates glow with an eerie beauty. Used to monitor the progress of a reaction or as an initial purity test of a newly prepared chemical product, a pile of TLC plates like this is often the end result of a long day of chemical research.
Submitted By: John Anderson (jander43@utk.edu) (Enter our photo contest here)

LENDING A HAND

Protibha Nath Banerjee of the University of Dodoma, in Tanzania, generates dimsyl potassium by reacting anhydrous dimethyl sulphoxide with potassium hydride under argon gas (filling the glove). He uses the dimsyl reagent to methylate polysaccharides that contain uronic acid moieties. Banerjee is trying to elucidate the structure of a polysaccharide isolated from apricot seeds to determine its potential use in medicine. Methylation analysis is among the best methods for elucidating the structure of complex polysaccharides.

Credit: Submitted by Protibha Nath Banerjee (Enter our photo contest here)


LENDING A HAND
Protibha Nath Banerjee of the University of Dodoma, in Tanzania, generates dimsyl potassium by reacting anhydrous dimethyl sulphoxide with potassium hydride under argon gas (filling the glove). He uses the dimsyl reagent to methylate polysaccharides that contain uronic acid moieties. Banerjee is trying to elucidate the structure of a polysaccharide isolated from apricot seeds to determine its potential use in medicine. Methylation analysis is among the best methods for elucidating the structure of complex polysaccharides. 
Credit: Submitted by Protibha Nath Banerjee (Enter our photo contest here)

LENDING A HAND

Protibha Nath Banerjee of the University of Dodoma, in Tanzania, generates dimsyl potassium by reacting anhydrous dimethyl sulphoxide with potassium hydride under argon gas (filling the glove). He uses the dimsyl reagent to methylate polysaccharides that contain uronic acid moieties. Banerjee is trying to elucidate the structure of a polysaccharide isolated from apricot seeds to determine its potential use in medicine. Methylation analysis is among the best methods for elucidating the structure of complex polysaccharides.

Credit: Submitted by Protibha Nath Banerjee (Enter our photo contest here)

CLOSE-UP NERVES

During a lab experiment aimed at understanding human anatomy, Mirna Solís, an undergraduate chemistry student at the University of Guanajuato, Mexico, used an optical microscope to observe these stained neurons from a sample of nerve tissue. 

Credit: Submitted by Mirna Solís (Enter our photo contest here)

CLOSE-UP NERVES
During a lab experiment aimed at understanding human anatomy, Mirna Solís, an undergraduate chemistry student at the University of Guanajuato, Mexico, used an optical microscope to observe these stained neurons from a sample of nerve tissue.  
Credit: Submitted by Mirna Solís (Enter our photo contest here)

CLOSE-UP NERVES

During a lab experiment aimed at understanding human anatomy, Mirna Solís, an undergraduate chemistry student at the University of Guanajuato, Mexico, used an optical microscope to observe these stained neurons from a sample of nerve tissue. 

Credit: Submitted by Mirna Solís (Enter our photo contest here)

STARRY EYED

Just in time for the Jewish High Holidays comes a Star of David catenane. The molecule, which was synthesized by chemists David A. Leigh, Robin G. Pritchard, and Alexander J. Stephens at the University of Manchester, in England, consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings. “The Star of David catenane is the most highly entwined mechanically interlocked molecule made to date,” Leigh says. “Linking and entwining molecular rings may lead to new generations of materials that are strong but light and flexible.”

Credit:  Nat. Chem. 2014, DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2056 

Related C&EN Stories:

Packing On Positive Charge

STARRY EYED

Just in time for the Jewish High Holidays comes a Star of David catenane. The molecule, which was synthesized by chemists David A. Leigh, Robin G. Pritchard, and Alexander J. Stephens at the University of Manchester, in England, consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings. “The Star of David catenane is the most highly entwined mechanically interlocked molecule made to date,” Leigh says. “Linking and entwining molecular rings may lead to new generations of materials that are strong but light and flexible.”

Credit:  Nat. Chem. 2014, DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2056 

Related C&EN Stories:

Packing On Positive Charge

NO DELICACY

These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”

Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

NO DELICACY


These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”
Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

NO DELICACY

These oysters, collected from an estuary in Southern China, owe their blue color to contamination with metals including Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr. Insufficient controls on industrial and domestic dumping into the water system threaten the viability of many Chinese villages that traditionally rely on rice and seafood for their meals, the researchers say. The blue oysters “are a cry for a national focus on metal pollution in estuaries in China.”

Credit: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/es503549b

GOLD MINE

Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.

Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

GOLD MINE
Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.
Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

GOLD MINE

Transmission electron microscopy image of a gold nanotriangle that was stabilized during synthesis with extract from the peel of a grapefruit. Using peel extract in the future production of high-performance materials could be an additional source of revenue for farmers and could help provide a non-food-based market for agro-wastes.

Credit: Submitted by Brajesh Kumar (Enter our photo contest here)

Congratulations to Andres Tretiakov, a lab technician at St. Paul’s School in London, who photographed element blocks that he’s creating to assemble a tangible periodic table.
Tretiakov will receive a $50 cash prize. A Grand Prize winner will be selected at the end of the year. They will get their photograph published in C&EN and receive a Canon Digital SLR Camera.

Enter our monthly photo contest here for your chance to win!

SELECTIVE

Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.

Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)


SELECTIVE
Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.
Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)

SELECTIVE

Scattered light from two different laser beams, one blue (445 nm wavelength) and one green (532 nm), passes through a filter that allows all wavelengths of light to pass through except 532 nm. Kenneth Hanson, who took this photo, says filters like this are useful in measuring photon upconversion, a process in which multiple photons of a given wavelength get absorbed and then emitted at a shorter wavelength. Here, the filter allows emitted light (around 450 nm) to pass while filtering out the high-intensity absorbed light (532 nm). Scientists are eyeing photon upconversion for use in solar energy applications.

Credit: Submitted by Kenneth Hanson (Enter our photo contest here)